Counselling Service


LGBTQ+

Sexuality refers to all aspects of sexual behaviour. Physiology, psychology and social factors all play a part in determining who attracts us and how we attract others. Gender identity denotes a person's innermost concept of self as man, woman, a blend of both, or neither. A person's gender identity informs how they perceive themselves and what they prefer to call themselves. Gender identity can be the same or different from a person's sex assigned at birth. It’s complicated and defies neat classification. So lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans become approximate labels for what is an intensely personal experience of sexuality and/or gender identity. Hence the catch-all Q for ‘queer’ or ‘questioning’ at the end of the LGBTQ acronym. As we have developed a more nuanced appreciation, the plus symbol has come to represent inclusion and embracing of the spectrum of sexuality and gender identity.

Knowing your sexual orientation and feeling proud and happy about it comes easily to some people from an early age. For others it emerges much later and can be a difficult and, or, confusing process.

Common problems include coming out to yourself and coming out to others. Talking through the issues, your feelings and your experiences, is often critically important and there are plenty of places to get help.

The University’s commitment to “providing an environment free from discrimination, bullying, harassment or victimisation, where all members of its community are treated with respect and dignity” is set out in its Equality and Diversity policy. The University understands nonetheless that discrimination exists and that LGBT students can face difficulties in feeling they are equal participants in university life and experience barriers to succeeding in higher education. The LGBT Staff Network and LGBTQ+ Society work hard to address these and many other problems and the Counselling Service is part of the wider network of support. The University has participated in Stonewall's Employer Index for workplace equality for the past five years and was recently ranked 16th in Stonewall's Employer Index for Workplace Equality 2018. The University is in Stonewall's top ten list as a trans employer.

New LGBTQ+ Support Group!

A new friendly support group welcomes students identifying with the LGBTQ+ spectrum who are experiencing psychological difficulties. The group is run by students and supported by the Counselling Service. Members talk openly about mental health in a safe and supportive environment. Although not a therapy group, it does offer a space to share difficulties and explore new ways forward.

Each week the group will choose different topics of interest or concern to LGBTQ+ students. The group runs alternate Wednesdays in the UMSA Room, Ground Floor Wellbeing Rooms, Simon Building from 1pm - 2.30pm.

More information from uomlgbtqsociety@gmail.com

Date

Time

Location

19th September 2018

1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
3rd October 2018 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
17th October 2018 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
31st October 2018 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
14th November 2018 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
28th November 2018 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
12th December 2018 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
23rd January 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
6th February 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
20th February 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
6th March 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
20th March 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
3rd April 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
8th May 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
22nd May 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building
5th June 2019 1pm - 2.30pm UMSA Room, Simon Building

Report and Support

We're committed to making the University a safe and welcoming place to work, study and live. We are all responsible for standing up to bullying or harassment, wherever we see it.

If you feel you are the victim of bullying or harassment, or if you know someone who is, you can report it - anonymously if you wish - using the online Report and Support system. If you choose, you will be contacted by a trained adviser who can get you the right support you need.

Report and Support link

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